Sign InSign Up
All Posts

Liver Cells

Learn how liver cells can protect your health and why they are essential to overall well-being.
2023-01-29

Review of Liver Cells

The liver is an incredibly important and complex organ in the human body, responsible for many of the body's metabolic processes. Because of its importance, it is essential to understand the structure of liver cells and their various functions. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of liver cells, focusing on their histology.

Anatomy of the Liver

The liver is the largest internal organ in the body, located in the upper right portion of the abdominal cavity near the gallbladder and stomach. It is divided into two main lobes, the right and left lobes, which are further divided into eight segments. Each segment is composed of many small lobules, which are the basic functional units of the liver. The lobules are composed of two main types of cells: hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells.

Hepatocytes

Hepatocytes are the main functional cells in the liver, and are responsible for many metabolic processes such as protein synthesis, glycogen storage, and the metabolism of drugs and toxins. These cells are arranged in a hexagonal pattern and are connected by tight junctions that form a barrier between the cells.

Hepatocytes are large cells with multiple organelles, including a large nucleus, multiple mitochondria, and a well-developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The ER is responsible for protein synthesis, and the mitochondria are the site of energy production. The nucleus is highly condensed and contains a large number of DNA molecules and a large number of ribosomes.

Non-Parenchymal Cells

Non-parenchymal cells are found in the connective tissue of the liver and are responsible for providing support and protection to the hepatocytes. These cells include Kupffer cells, macrophages, and lymphocytes.

Kupffer cells are specialized macrophages that are found in the connective tissue of the liver. They are responsible for the phagocytosis of bacteria and other foreign particles. Macrophages are also found in the liver and are responsible for the production of cytokines and other immune mediators. Lymphocytes are also found in the connective tissue of the liver and are responsible for the production of antibodies.

Histology of the Liver

The histology of the liver is complex and consists of several layers. The outermost layer is the capsule, which is composed of dense connective tissue and provides support and protection to the liver. The second layer is the Glisson's capsule, which is composed of smooth muscle cells and provides a barrier between the liver and other organs.

The third layer is the lobule, which is composed of hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells. The fourth layer is the sinusoidal layer, which is composed of endothelial cells and is responsible for the exchange of nutrients and waste between the hepatocytes and the bloodstream.

The fifth layer is the portal layer, which is composed of nerve fibers and is important for regulating the metabolism of the liver. The sixth layer is the bile ducts, which are responsible for the production and secretion of bile. Finally, the seventh layer is the connective tissue, which is composed of collagen fibers and provides support and protection to the liver.

Conclusion

This review has provided an overview of the histology of the liver and its various cells. The liver is composed of several layers, including the capsule, Glisson's capsule, lobule, sinusoidal layer, portal layer, bile ducts, and connective tissue. The main functional cells of the liver are the hepatocytes, which are responsible for many metabolic processes. Non-parenchymal cells, such as Kupffer cells, macrophages, and lymphocytes, are also found in the liver and are responsible for providing support and protection to the hepatocytes.

USMLE Test Prep
a StudyNova service

Support

GuidesStep 1 Sample QuestionsStep 2 Sample QuestionsStep 3 Sample QuestionsPricing

Install App coming soon

© 2024 StudyNova, Inc. All rights reserved.

TwitterYouTube